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"Brands use your birthday as an excuse to tell you they exist."

The Internet of Things Will Ruin Birthdays — Joanne McNeil on Medium (via nickdouglas)

(via nickdouglas)

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newyorker:

Judith Thurman on the global business of sartorial slumming: http://nyr.kr/1oFBDVF

“Levis first reached the East Coast in the luggage of rich vacationers who had seen them on dude ranches. Since then, the lust for ‘authenticity’ has proved to be a lucrative contagion.”

Above: Kim Kardashian.  Credit Photograph by Clint Brewer/Splash News/Corbis. 

newyorker:

Judith Thurman on the global business of sartorial slumming: http://nyr.kr/1oFBDVF

“Levis first reached the East Coast in the luggage of rich vacationers who had seen them on dude ranches. Since then, the lust for ‘authenticity’ has proved to be a lucrative contagion.”

Above: Kim Kardashian. Credit Photograph by Clint Brewer/Splash News/Corbis. 

(Source: newyorker.com)

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natashavc:

I believed that part of being a high schooler, universally, meant that by the time you graduated you wanted to be a movie director. Obviously, this was far more isolated than I understood it be at the time. I realize now that we all felt this way because:

1) we grew in Los Angeles

2) we were sophmores in 1999. we couldn’t drive, we walked to the movies, rode our BMXs, nagged our parents to take us. And every weekend for over a year there was some amazing movie out. A mini golden era that was gone by 2003. Some of the movies haven’t aged well and I’ve out grown a lot of them. But Magnolia, Three Kings, American Beauty, Fight Club, Office Space, The Matrix, Talented Mr. Ripley, South Park. EVERY FUCKING WEEKEND was some triumph of voice and visuals. No wonder, NO WONDER we all believed we could have the magic, it seemed to be everywhere. 

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"You keep these kids ignorant and then suddenly they’re in a situation that they don’t even have the words for and they have no idea what to do,” she says. “They’re not taught how to ask for consent, how to give consent, how to revoke consent and stop mid-way through. They don’t know to use protection or to demand it if it’s absent, they don’t know this will spread STIs and pregnancy. They don’t know it’s not supposed to hurt. Can you believe that? So, so, so many people think that sex is supposed to hurt the partner with a vagina when they have sex for the first time. They think that’s just the way it is, that’s just how it goes. *That* is obscene to me. Enforced ignorance that inevitably results in physical and emotional damage, *that’s* obscenity."

— Rich Goldstein asked me what I consider to be obscene in his article on my work, ‘Oh Joy Sex Toy’: The Internet’s Most Radical Sex-Fueled Comic Strip (via awelltraveledwoman)

(Source: erikamoen, via awelltraveledwoman)

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mykicks:

I still spend a lot of time wondering what my Tumblarity would be right now.

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There came a point where they realized it’d be a good idea to add a leaf and a nub #truestory

There came a point where they realized it’d be a good idea to add a leaf and a nub #truestory

Tags: truestory
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Danish wedding cake [tester]

Danish wedding cake [tester]

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brightwalldarkroom:

"There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption? 
I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.
Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”
—Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights (Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #14, July 2014)

brightwalldarkroom:

"There are a handful of shows I ask everyone I talk to about television if they have seen: The Wire, Mad Men, Friday Night Lights. But when I ask them if they’ve watched and loved Friday Night Lights, what I mean is are you my kind of person? Are you all heart? Are you bothered by this 21st-century lack of earnestness, our abundance of irony? Do you wonder how we forgive and coach ourselves to do better? How we can strive again for valor and loyalty and daring and redemption? 

I fear we are defaulting to needless negativity as some kind of social currency. But Friday Night Lights is the most earnest show I’ve ever watched. Not sentimental, however: these characters aren’t perfect. In fact, this show is incredibly astute at allowing humans to have stratums of complexity: to have character and occasionally act without it, and then to live in the mire of their own dumb choices. Do I adore Coach? Yes. Do I think, as Tammy says, he is a molder of men and a husband of fierce devotion? Absolutely. Do I also think he can also be a self-involved, sexist prick who values his career over his wife’s? No question.

Regardless of the scale of the battle, the stakes in Friday Night Lights are rarely phony or contrived. It’s about winning games, sure, but its scope far exceeds that. This is a show that tests and reflects commitment not just on the football field, but back in the locker room. And in Street’s rehab room, and Saracen’s grandmother’s living room, and Julie’s bedroom, and eventually out to Luke’s farm and Tim’s prison and Tammy’s dream in Philadelphia. This commitment is not about obligation, but something more sacred. Duty. The hidden gale that blusters and grows within us and makes us yearn to give someone else exactly what they need.”

—Erica Cantoni on Friday Night Lights (Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #14, July 2014)

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I can’t wait to go home in a month.

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(Source: queerpoc, via mareluna3001)

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"‘Drunk History’ is more like your craziest autodidact buddy telling you the weirdest story he ever heard about Hitler. The facts are not in dispute, they’re just delivered in a way that is blunt and personal, with biases up front instead of hidden."

Emily Nussbaum on the show’s second season: http://nyr.kr/1nbYRlL (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

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gemmacorrell:

(via Four Eyes Comic Strip on GoComics.com)